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 24.11.2017, 02:27
Newsfeeds

Technology, Engineering, and Computer Science
pią, 24 lis 2017 02:27
EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) More than 95% of cast-iron in the world is still produced in blast furnaces. Modern blast furnaces are powerful units that produce tons of cast-iron daily, but they require prepared, high-quality raw materials like agglomerate cakes, steel pellets, and iron. Recycling industrial waste that contains iron (of which Russian enterprises alone produce more than 5 million tons of annually) is economically and technologically irresponsible and next-to-impossible in blast furnaces.
NUST MISIS metallurgists were the first to develop a unique furnace for the recycling of waste
(UniversitÊde Genève) Currently the most important technology for batteries is the lithium-ion battery technology: but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid. To satisfy the growing demand from emerging markets, researchers from Empa and UNIGE have devised a new battery prototype: known as "all-solid-state", this battery has the potential to store more energy while maintaining high safety and reliability levels. Furthermore, the battery is based on sodium, a cheap alternative to lithium.
New batteries with better performance and improved safety
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT physicists have invented a new technique to cool atoms into condensates, which is faster than the conventional method and conserves a large fraction of the original atoms. The team used a new process of laser cooling to cool a cloud of rubidium atoms all the way from room temperature to 1 microkelvin, or less than one-millionth of a degree above absolute zero.
Physicists develop faster way to make Bose-Einstein condensates
(Columbia University Medical Center) Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork for a new class of technologies that use bacterial cells for everything from disease diagnosis to environmental monitoring.
World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes
(University of Delaware) Engineer Tingyi Gu is developing thin two-dimensional materials, made atomic layer by atomic layer, that may enable communications at higher speed and lower power consumption than previously realized.
Communicating at the speed of light
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A new Clinical Implications of Basic Research paper highlights a novel surgical adhesive on the horizon.
The future of sutures and staples: A sealant inspired by slugs
(California Institute of Technology) An empirical model of 55 of California's major reservoirs reveals how they respond to shifting drought conditions and to one another.
Engineers model the California reservoir network
Education
pią, 24 lis 2017 02:27
EurekAlert! - Education
(Elsevier) As the UK prepares to leave the European Union, securing appropriate funding sources for science is among the primary challenges UK-based researchers want their government to tackle. An Elsevier/Ipsos MORI survey shows that 90 percent of UK-based researchers suggest that any European research funding no longer accessible to UK academic institutions after Brexit should be replaced by equivalent UK government funding.
Researchers say funding should be top goal for gov/academic institutions following Brexit
(Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams) Michigan State University is establishing an Accelerator Science and Engineering Traineeship program to address a national shortage in accelerator scientists and engineers. The US Department of Energy Office of Science Office of High Energy Physics has awarded MSU a $990,000 accelerator science and engineering traineeship grant to develop the program.
MSU to establish training program to address shortage in accelerator scientists, engineers
(Carnegie Mellon University) A novel method, developed by an economist at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, has been created to evaluate a worker's skillset and determine its impact on wages.
New tool can help job searchers better position themselves in market
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3-D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology &Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, made the detailed research possible.
Turtles &technology advance understanding of lung abnormality
(American Chemical Society) If you've ever tapped a screen to send a tweet, opted for a glass bottled soda because of taste, or drooled over art glass in a gallery, then your life has been changed for the better by the transparent yet durable combination of sand and simple chemicals we call glass. Reactions visited McFadden Art Glass in Baltimore, Maryland, to learn about the chemistry of this ancient material.
The art and science of glassblowing (video)
(American Geophysical Union) The American Geophysical Union (AGU) today announced the three winners of its Open API Challenge, including first place winners Bennett Battaile and Meenakshi Rao for their "AGU Explorer"app. AGU's Open Application Programming Interface (API) Challenge tasked participants with using the broad wealth of data from its 2014, 2015, and 2016 Fall Meeting scientific programs in innovative ways to create an interactive web-based application that added value to the scientific program data in some way.
American Geophysical Union announces Open API Challenge winners
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Physicists at MIT have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.
MIT physicists design $100 handheld muon detector
Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Sciences
pią, 24 lis 2017 02:27
EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences
(UniversitÊde Genève) Currently the most important technology for batteries is the lithium-ion battery technology: but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid. To satisfy the growing demand from emerging markets, researchers from Empa and UNIGE have devised a new battery prototype: known as "all-solid-state", this battery has the potential to store more energy while maintaining high safety and reliability levels. Furthermore, the battery is based on sodium, a cheap alternative to lithium.
New batteries with better performance and improved safety
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT physicists have invented a new technique to cool atoms into condensates, which is faster than the conventional method and conserves a large fraction of the original atoms. The team used a new process of laser cooling to cool a cloud of rubidium atoms all the way from room temperature to 1 microkelvin, or less than one-millionth of a degree above absolute zero.
Physicists develop faster way to make Bose-Einstein condensates
(Columbia University Medical Center) Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork for a new class of technologies that use bacterial cells for everything from disease diagnosis to environmental monitoring.
World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes
(ecancermedicalscience) Antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could make tumour cells more sensitive to cancer treatment.
Antimalarial drugs could support existing cancer treatments in two-pronged attack
(University of East Anglia) The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed according to new research led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA).The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis.
Research reveals China's reversing emission flows
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers have designed a metamaterial that can twist to the right or the left in response to a straight, solid push.
Push to twist: Achieving the classically impossible in human-made material
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A detailed comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee and macaque brains reveals elements that make the human brain unique, including cortical circuits underlying production of the neurotransmitter dopamine.
Comparison of primate brains hints at what makes us human
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