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 25.02.2018, 10:27
Newsfeeds

Technology, Engineering, and Computer Science
nie, 25 lut 2018 10:27
EurekAlert! - Technology, Engineering and Computer Science
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Many hospital patients get medicine or nutrition delivered straight into their bloodstream through a tiny device called a PICC. In just a decade, it's become the go-to device for intravenous care.But a new study finds that one in every four times a PICC gets inserted, the patient didn't need it long enough to justify the risks it can pose. And nearly one in ten of those patients suffered a complication linked to the device.
Short-term use of IV devices is common -- and risky -- study shows
(Syracuse University) A Syracuse University researcher explores the impact of de-icing salt from roads and highways on a local watershed. She says their findings make her 'cautiously optimistic' about the watershed's future surface-water chloride concentrations.
Scientists examine link between surface-water salinity, climate change
(New York Genome Center) As described in a study published today in Nature Communications, researchers at the New York Genome Center (NYGC) and New York University (NYU) have taken steps to facilitate broad access to single-cell sequencing by developing a 3-D-printed, portable and low-cost microfluidic controller. To demonstrate the utility of the instrument in clinical environments, the researchers deployed the device to study synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).
New device for low-cost single-cell analysis identifies fibroblast subtypes in RA patients
(GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre) The nights in the German federal states („Bundesländer") have been getting brighter and brighter in the last four years -- but not everywhere at the same rate and with one exemption: Thuringia. This is the result of a study by scientists Chris Kyba and Theres Küster from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences together with Helga Kuechly from 'Luftbild - Umwelt - Planung, Potsdam'. They published the study in the International Journal of Sustainable Lighting.
German nights get brighter -- but not everywhere
(Portland State University) PSU business school professor's research shows that companies that hire a more diverse set of employees are rewarded with a richer pipeline of innovative products and a stronger financial position.
PSU study: Pro-diversity policies make companies more innovative and profitable
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) New study from MIT and CNRS shows a way to dial down the urban heat island effects that can pump up city temperatures, through different city planning based on classical physics formulas.
How cities heat up
(American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics) The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) congratulates the Gerald R. Ford International Airport Authority as the 2018 winner of the Jay Hollingsworth Speas Airport Award for its innovative and sustainable stormwater and deicing treatment system.
Gerald R. Ford Airport wins 2018 Speas Award for stormwater treatment system
Education
nie, 25 lut 2018 10:27
EurekAlert! - Education
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Harold S. Koplewicz, MD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology and President of the Child Mind Institute has spoken out on the Parkland shooting and the urgent need to make mental health a priority for research and action.
Noted child psychiatrist Harold Koplewicz, MD, speaks out on the Parkland shooting
(University of California - Los Angeles) A study by ISGlobal, a center supported by the 'la Caixa' Banking Foundation, in collaboration with Hospital del Mar and UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health, shows for the first time that exposure to green space during childhood is associated with beneficial structural changes in the developing brain.
Being raised in greener neighborhoods may have beneficial effects on brain development
(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) The world of health care is changing rapidly and there is increased interest in the role that light and lighting can play in improving health outcomes for patients and providing healthy work environments for staff, according to many researchers. Recently, the Center for Lighting Enabled Systems &Applications (LESA) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, together with the Illumination Engineering Society (IES), sponsored a workshop to explore pathways to define and promote the adoption of lighting systems specifically for health-care environments.
Transforming patient health care and well-being through lighting
(Elsevier) Preschool is a critical period for children to begin to make their own dietary decisions to develop life-long healthy eating habits. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that preschoolers who learned how to classify food as healthy or unhealthy were more likely to say they would choose healthy food as a snack.
Descriptive phrases for how often food should be eaten helps preschoolers better understand healthy eating
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) High-quality early care and education (ECE) is critical to positive child development and has the potential to generate economic returns, but the current financing structure of ECE leaves many children without access to high-quality services and does little to strengthen the ECE workforce, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
Financial structure of early childhood edu. Requires overhaul to make it accessible and affordable
(Boston College) A study of more than 60,000 children enrolled in Norway's universal early education system has found the program improves language skills and narrows achievement gaps, according to a team of researchers from the US and Norway, led by Boston College Professor of Education Eric Dearing.
Study finds language, achievement benefits of universal early childhood education
(Aarhus University) A new report suggests that while UK universities are likely to suffer because of Brexit, German universities may reap the benefits.
German universities likely to benefit from Brexit, report suggests
Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Sciences
nie, 25 lut 2018 10:27
EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences
(Shinshu University) Researchers have developed a new way to improve lithium ion battery efficiency. Through the growth of a cubic crystal layer, the scientists have created a thin and dense connecting layer between the electrodes of the battery. "We believe that our approach having robustness against side reactions at the interface could possibly lead to the production of ideal ceramic separators with a thin and dense interface."
Charging ahead to higher energy batteries
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A dramatic magnetic power struggle at the Sun's surface lies at the heart of solar eruptions, new research using NASA data shows.
NASA's SDO reveals how magnetic cage on the Sun stopped solar eruption
(University of Houston) Aromaticity and hydrogen bonding are both well-established chemical concepts, but for the past 200 years, they have been considered as largely separate ideas. Judy Wu, a computational quantum chemist at the University of Houston, earned a National Science Foundation CAREER award for her proposal suggesting that connecting the two could change the way chemists view hydrogen bonds and potentially guide experimental efforts in the design of advanced materials
UH chemist Judy Wu receives NSF CAREER Award for hydrogen bond research
(University of Houston) A team of researchers in the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is analyzing a few small fragments of the Tissint meteorite with the help of a $349,520, three-year grant from the NASA Solar System Workings program.
As good as old: The age of martian meteorites gives clues to the makeup of Mars
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) New research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry identifies an enzyme that turns off transglutaminase 2, potentially paving the way for new treatments for celiac disease.
Looking for an off switch for celiac disease
(Fundação de Amparo àPesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Brazilian scientists compare primitive Earth scenario with satellite Europa's conditions; the jupiterian moon could host microorganisms at the bottom of a huge warm ocean located underneath its frozen crust.
Model based on hydrothermal sources evaluate possibility of life Jupiter's icy moon
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Mßnchen) Munich based Laser physicists have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis.
Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules